Skip To Main Content

Our City Classroom

When Xavier moved to 16th Street in 1850, few could have imagined the school in 2021. Back then, the surrounding neighborhood was rural. Shade trees dotted the landscape.

In the 171 years since, Xavier has grown and thrived, a stalwart of the neighborhood surrounding Union Square, and students have learned some of their most valuable lessons from the city itself. Acquiring the New Yorker's trademark street smarts is central to a Xavier education, as is soaking in the myriad opportunities our location offers.

map

Legend

The High Line
Irish Repertory Theatre
Madison Square Park
Baruch College
School of Visual Arts
Chelsea Market
J’s Pizza
Center for Jewish History’
Flatiron Building
Theodore Roosevelt Birthplace National Historic Site
Little Island
The Donut Pub
Rubin Museum of Art (RMA)
Barnes & Noble
Union Square Cafe
Whitney Museum of American Art
The Church of St. Francis Xavier
Tibet House U.S.
Breads Bakery
Union Square Park
Tammany Hall
The New School
The Strand Bookstore
Washington Square Park
New York University (NYU)
Cooper Union for Adv. Science

Map Points 2

The High Line

An elevated public park built on a historic freight rail line, the High Line opened in 2009 after being saved from demolition by neighborhood residents and the City of New York.

Irish Repertory Theatre

Founded in 1988, the Irish Rep is an award-winning, off-Broadway theatre featuring Irish and Irish-American drama.

Madison Square Park

First opened to the public a few months before Xavier’s founding in 1847, Madison Square Park—named for President James Madison—provides a happy respite from the hustle and bustle of the city.

Baruch College

Part of the CUNY system, Baruch provides itself on providing an inclusive, transformative education, acting as a catalyst for the economic and social mobility of its diverse student population. Its nearly 20,000 students speak more than 110 languages.

School of Visual Arts

A leader in the education of artists, designers, and creative professionals since 1947, SVA is a multidisciplinary college of art and design known for its faculty of distinguished working professionals.

Chelsea Market

A hive of activity in the Meatpacking District, Chelsea Market is a renowned culinary destination—one of the world’s great indoor food and retail marketplaces. It attracts 6 million visitors each year.

J’s Pizza

A Xavier favorite, J’s is an old-school New York City pizza parlor serving a variety of pizzas, heroes, hot entrees, and pasta dishes.

Center for Jewish History

Located just across the street from Xavier, the Center is home to five partner organizations that house the world’s most comprehensive archive of the modern Jewish experience outside of Israel.

Flatiron Building

Designed in Beaux-Arts style and shaped like a perfect right triangle, the iconic Flatiron Building, built in 1902, is an enduring symbol of New York.

Theodore Roosevelt Birthplace National Historic Site

The first president born in New York City, Theodore Roosevelt was born and raised at 28 East 20th Street. The brownstone—now designated a National Historic Site—has been recreated as a replica of Roosevelt’s childhood home circa 1865.

Little Island

A brand-new public park at Pier 55, the 2.4-acre Little Island features an amphitheater, stage, and lawn space nestled among 350 species of flowers, trees, and shrubs.

The Donut Pub

A Chelsea institution since 1964, The Donut Pub serves up delicious donuts, cookies, and croissant donuts—and they’re all peanut and tree nut-free. 

Rubin Museum of Art

The Rubin celebrates the diversity and uniqueness of Himalayan art, ideas, and cultures across history and into the present. A robust series of visitor-centered events focused on mind science and family activities complements the Rubin’s cultural exhibitions.

Barnes & Noble

Manhattan’s largest bookstore, the four-story Barnes & Noble on Union Square features a large coffee shop and often plays host to notable authors.

Union Square Café

A special-occasion favorite, the Union Square Café launched famed restaurateur Danny Meyer’s Union Square Hospitality Group in 1985. The winner of five James Beard Awards, it is now one of the country’s most beloved eateries.

Whitney Museum of American Art

Ensconced between the High Line and the Hudson River, the Whitney is the preeminent institution devoted to American art. The museum, with its focus on 20th century and contemporary American art, has a special interest in works by living artists.

The Church of St. Francis Xavier

“A monumental church,” in the words of The New York Times, St. Francis Xavier is an architectural marvel built in Roman Basilica style with a Neo-Baroque exterior. Fully restored to its original grandeur in 2010, the church boasts 47 murals, 35 statues, ornamental plasterwork, and marble furnishings.

Tibet House U.S.

Founded at the request of the Dalai Lama, Tibet House US—opened in 1987—works to ensure the survival of Tibetan civilization and culture. Its programs and exhibits focus on the beauty of Tibetan art as well as mindfulness, wisdom, and contemplative practices.

Breads Bakery

Location down the street from Xavier, Breads is a quintessential New York bakery known worldwide for its chocolate babka—a magical confection crafted with Nutella and dark chocolate. The café serves salads and sandwiches in addition to baked goods.

Union Square Park

Designated a National Historic Landmark, the lively, bustling Union Square Park—opened in 1839—is an energetic gathering place for students, commuters, street artists, and shoppers at the perennially popular Union Square Greenmarket, which draws thousands of New Yorkers on Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, and Saturdays.

Tammany Hall

44 Union Square East was once the headquarters of Tammany Hall, the Democratic political machine that dominated city politics from the 1790s well into the 20th century. Its complicated history is marked by rampant corruption as well as critical assistance for the city’s poor and immigrant populations, which turned them into loyal voters.

The New School

Founded in 1919 as The New School for Social Research, the university now houses multiple divisions—Parsons School of Design, Eugene Lang College of Liberal Arts, the College of Performing Arts, The New School for Social Research, the Schools of Public Engagement, and Parsons Paris.

The Strand Bookstore

A landmark independent bookstore dating back to 1927, the Strand carries more than 2.5 million new, used, and rare tomes and an impressive assortment of gifts and goods. In-store events often feature literary luminaries.

Washington Square Park

Named for George Washington, who was inaugurated in New York City in 1989, Washington Square Park is the heart of Greenwich Village. A meeting place and cultural center for generations, the 9.75-acre park is marked by its triumphal arch.

New York University (NYU)

Founded in 1831, NYU is the largest private university in the United States and one of the largest employers in New York City. NYU educates more than 50,000 students and undertakes nearly $1 billion in research annually.

Cooper Union

Established in 1859, the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art—which offers degrees in art, architecture, and engineering—is a distinguished institution of higher education. The school’s Great Hall has hosted some of America’s greatest thinkers, including seven serving or future U.S. presidents.